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electrical:12v:battery_monitor

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electrical:12v:battery_monitor [2020/04/15 21:02]
frater_secessus [how they work]
electrical:12v:battery_monitor [2020/04/15 21:03] (current)
frater_secessus [how they work]
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   - you tell the monitor the battery'​s [[electrical:​12v:​battery_capacity|capacity]],​ usually in Ah and printed right on the battery. ​ Remember that lead batteries are typically only used to about 50% of their rated capacity. ​ You'll either be making that mental adjustment when you configure the meter or when you read it later. ​ Battery capacity will also degrade over time, requiring the capacity setting to be adjusted periodically.((every 6 months? 12 months?))   - you tell the monitor the battery'​s [[electrical:​12v:​battery_capacity|capacity]],​ usually in Ah and printed right on the battery. ​ Remember that lead batteries are typically only used to about 50% of their rated capacity. ​ You'll either be making that mental adjustment when you configure the meter or when you read it later. ​ Battery capacity will also degrade over time, requiring the capacity setting to be adjusted periodically.((every 6 months? 12 months?))
   - you tell the monitor the voltage at which the battery is presumed to be at [[electrical:​depth_of_discharge|100% State of Charge]]. ​ For lead this will be something like 12.7v, and for LiFePO4 it will be something like 13.8v -- check your [[electrical:​solar:​charge_controller_setpoints|battery manufacturer'​s technical info]] for this value.   - you tell the monitor the voltage at which the battery is presumed to be at [[electrical:​depth_of_discharge|100% State of Charge]]. ​ For lead this will be something like 12.7v, and for LiFePO4 it will be something like 13.8v -- check your [[electrical:​solar:​charge_controller_setpoints|battery manufacturer'​s technical info]] for this value.
-  - the monitor will watch for your system to hit **the configured 100% state of charge voltage**, ​then +  - the monitor will watch for your system to hit **the configured 100% state of charge voltage**, ​at which it assumes your bank is "​full"​. ​ Then, 
-  - **counts Amps/Watts in and out while below that voltage**, thereby calculating the percentage of capacity used and percentage remaining. ​ This is an imperfect science with lead batteries because 100% SoC is only reliable after a //​complete//​ charge, and because different discharge rates will change the effective capacity. ​  Think of the monitor as general guidance for lead batteries rather than gospel. Lithium banks will align more closely with what the monitor shows. ​+  - when your system drops below that voltage ​**it counts Amps/Watts in and out**, thereby calculating the percentage of capacity used and percentage remaining. ​ This is an imperfect science with lead batteries because 100% SoC is only reliable after a //​complete//​ charge, and because different discharge rates will change the effective capacity. ​  Think of the monitor as general guidance for lead batteries rather than gospel. Lithium banks will align more closely with what the monitor shows. ​
  
 Note:  [[electrical:​solar:​status|Watching amps trail off]] at the end of lead Absorption (endAmps) will also tell you when the bank is [[electrical:​12v:​charging|fully charged]]. ​ The battery manufacturer will specify something like [[electrical:​12v:​battery_capacity|C/​200]] or C/100 as a sign Absorption is complete. ​ Note:  [[electrical:​solar:​status|Watching amps trail off]] at the end of lead Absorption (endAmps) will also tell you when the bank is [[electrical:​12v:​charging|fully charged]]. ​ The battery manufacturer will specify something like [[electrical:​12v:​battery_capacity|C/​200]] or C/100 as a sign Absorption is complete. ​
electrical/12v/battery_monitor.txt · Last modified: 2020/04/15 21:03 by frater_secessus