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electrical:inverter [2019/03/13 12:36]
frater_secessus [differences from shore power 120vac]
electrical:inverter [2019/03/13 12:36] (current)
frater_secessus [differences from shore power 120vac]
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 > The situation gets more complicated when there'​s a 3-prong 120 VAC plug.  The third prong is a safety ground which is assumed to be tied to a ground rod. > The situation gets more complicated when there'​s a 3-prong 120 VAC plug.  The third prong is a safety ground which is assumed to be tied to a ground rod.
  
-> You can see that the neutral and ground wires [in shore power] are tied together at the panel. ​ That works, because the hot is 120 VAC.  You can also see how that is very different than two "​half-hot"​ 60 VAC lines, and how that kind of tie-in would short out one leg of an inverter. ​\+> You can see that the neutral and ground wires [in shore power] are tied together at the panel. ​ That works, because the hot is 120 VAC.  You can also see how that is very different than two "​half-hot"​ 60 VAC lines, and how that kind of tie-in would short out one leg of an inverter.
  
 > In fact, the situation with an inverter is very similar to [a] 240 VAC circuit... which has 2 120 VAC lines driven 180 degrees out of phase, i.e., "​push-pull."​((http://​thesurvivalpodcast.com/​forum/​index.php?​topic=63891.msg758502#​msg758502)) > In fact, the situation with an inverter is very similar to [a] 240 VAC circuit... which has 2 120 VAC lines driven 180 degrees out of phase, i.e., "​push-pull."​((http://​thesurvivalpodcast.com/​forum/​index.php?​topic=63891.msg758502#​msg758502))
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electrical/inverter.txt ยท Last modified: 2019/03/13 12:36 by frater_secessus