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communication:internet [2022/05/24 01:57]
princess_fluffypants [Satellite Internet]
communication:internet [2022/05/24 01:59] (current)
princess_fluffypants [Satellite Internet]
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 {{:communication:squishy.jpg?direct&200 |}} {{:communication:squishy.jpg?direct&200 |}}
  
-This is the holy grail of long-term van life, especially for those who prefer wilderness and remote areas. Historically Satellite internet services have been plagued by //very// high prices for minuscule data usage, and unrealistically bulky equipment (think DirectTV dishes). However with the advent of Starlink this is changing: https://www.tuckstruck.net/truck-and-kit/geekery/starlink-for-overlanders/+This is the holy grail of long-term van life, especially for those who prefer wilderness and remote areas. Historically Satellite internet services have been plagued by //very// high prices for minuscule data usage, and unrealistically bulky equipment (think DirectTV dishes). However with the advent of Starlink this is changing: https://www.starlink.com/rv
  
 Starlink is the satellite internet service offered by Space-X, and offers a tier of service specifically for RVs. $135/mo (and a $600 receiver) gets you extremely fast unlimited internet in most places in the country. Starlink is the satellite internet service offered by Space-X, and offers a tier of service specifically for RVs. $135/mo (and a $600 receiver) gets you extremely fast unlimited internet in most places in the country.
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 The catch is that Starlink //only// works in remote areas. If you have a cell phone signal, you're probably not far away enough from civilization to get Starlink. Out west this is usually not a problem, but east of the Mississippi river there is usually too much population density for the service to be usable. See the coverage map here: https://www.starlink.com/map The catch is that Starlink //only// works in remote areas. If you have a cell phone signal, you're probably not far away enough from civilization to get Starlink. Out west this is usually not a problem, but east of the Mississippi river there is usually too much population density for the service to be usable. See the coverage map here: https://www.starlink.com/map
  
-The receiver((who's official name is "Dishy McFlatface")) is also fairly large (about the size of a pizza box) and takes a lot of power (50-100w continuous draw).  It's a //portable// solution, but not a //mobile// solution.  The receiver isn't designed for the sort of vibration and forces imparted when driving, so the majority of Starlink users keep the dish inside the van with them and only deploy it when they're stopped somewhere for an extended period of time.+The receiver((who's official name is "Dishy McFlatface")) is also fairly large (about the size of a pizza box) and takes a lot of power (50-100w continuous draw).  It's a //portable// solution, but not a //mobile// solution.  The receiver isn't designed for the sort of vibration and forces imparted when driving, so the majority of Starlink users keep the dish inside the van with them and only deploy it when they're stopped somewhere for an extended period of time.  See one user's experience here:  https://www.tuckstruck.net/truck-and-kit/geekery/starlink-for-overlanders/
  
-When using Starlink outside of your designated service address, your traffic is de-prioritized over other users in the area and you may experience slower speeds.+When using Starlink on the RV plan, your traffic is de-prioritized over users who have a fixed address in the area and you may experience slower speeds.
  
 The Starlink dish is powered from the included router, or a PoE injector which runs off of AC wall power.  Experiments with powering the injector directly off of 12v DC using a Buck/Boost converter have yielded [[https://www.tuckstruck.net/truck-and-kit/geekery/modifying-the-starlink-power-supply-to-run-on-ac-and-dc/|net power savings of ~30%]]. The Starlink dish is powered from the included router, or a PoE injector which runs off of AC wall power.  Experiments with powering the injector directly off of 12v DC using a Buck/Boost converter have yielded [[https://www.tuckstruck.net/truck-and-kit/geekery/modifying-the-starlink-power-supply-to-run-on-ac-and-dc/|net power savings of ~30%]].
communication/internet.txt ยท Last modified: 2022/05/24 01:59 by princess_fluffypants